Gluten-free grains are becoming increasingly popular as more people are diagnosed with gluten intolerance or celiac disease. Celiac disease is an inherited autoimmune disease that affects the health of the small intestine and the digestive process. People without these conditions do not need to eat a gluten-free diet, but those who do must avoid gluten completely. That means avoiding wheat in all its forms (durum, einkorn, emmer, kamut, and spelt), barley, rye, and triticale. Without these grains in your diet, what alternatives should you try? Let’s take a look at a few options.

Quinoa

Quinoa is a nutrient-rich food that is high in protein and fiber and contains all the essential amino acids. It’s also a good source of iron and magnesium. Quinoa is a versatile grain that can be used in various dishes. You can use it as a side dish, in soups and salads, or as a main course. Quinoa is a healthy option for anyone, whether you’re following a gluten-free diet or not.

Flax

Flax is a gluten-free grain that is high in fiber and antioxidants. It can be used in a variety of ways, including as flour for baking or as a thickener for soups and sauces. Flax is also a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are beneficial for heart health.

Corn

Although corn is often considered a vegetable, it is a grain. It is a good source of fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins A and C. Corn can be eaten on its own or used in recipes. It can be found in many different forms, such as fresh, frozen, or canned.

Rice

There are many different types of rice, and all of them are gluten-free. Rice is rich in several nutrients, including B vitamins, potassium, magnesium, selenium, fiber, iron, and zinc. You can try white rice, brown rice, basmati rice, jasmine rice, sushi rice, and more. All these types of rice have different flavors and textures, so you can find one you like. Rice is versatile for different dishes. You can use it as a side dish, or you can use it as the main ingredient in a dish.

Millet

Millet is a gluten-free grain that is often used in birdseed. However, it is also a nutritious grain used in many different recipes. Millet is high in fiber and protein and is a good source of vitamins B6, C, E, and K, and minerals such as copper, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and selenium.

Teff

Teff is a small, gluten-free grain that originates from Ethiopia. It has a nutty flavor and can be used in various dishes. Teff can be cooked and served as porridge, used in flatbreads or pancakes, or even added to stews. It is a good source of iron and calcium and is also high in fiber.

Amaranth

Amaranth is a gluten-free grain that is native to South America. It has a nutty flavor and a chewy texture. Amaranth can be cooked like rice or used in soups and casseroles. It is a good source of fiber and protein.

Buckwheat

Buckwheat is a gluten-free grain often used in breakfast cereals and pancakes. It is high in fiber and protein and contains all essential amino acids. Buckwheat is also a good source of iron, magnesium, and phosphorus.

Sorghum

Sorghum is a gluten-free grain that is native to Africa. It is a staple food in many African countries. Sorghum has a nutty flavor and can be used in place of rice or other grains in recipes. It is also high in fiber, B vitamins, and micronutrients. Sorghum can be cooked like rice, or ground into flour for use in baking.

Oats

Oats are a type of grain that is naturally gluten-free. They are a good source of soluble dietary fiber, which acts as a prebiotic. Oats are also rich in iron and magnesium. Oatmeal is generally eaten as a porridge but may also be incorporated in cakes, cookies, and bread.

Polenta

Polenta is a great gluten-free grain that can be used in various dishes. It is made from cornmeal and has a slightly nutty flavor. Polenta can be cooked in water or broth, and then served with vegetables or meat. It can also be baked or fried. This grain is a good source of fiber and antioxidants. It is also low in calories and fat.

Courtney Simons
Administrator
Courtney Simons is a food science professor. He holds a BS degree in food science and a Ph.D. in cereal science from North Dakota State University. He also holds Masters degrees in both Environmental Science and Instructional Design from Wright State University.
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